The Warsaw Institute Review

The Warsaw Institute Review is a free Polish magazine of the Warsaw Institute Foundation. We would like to present a broad spectrum of topics concerning Poland, a leader among East-Central European countries, in the form of analytical articles on political, legal, economic, social, historical and institutional issues. The authors of the articles in The Warsaw Institute Review are, on the one hand, analysts and experts, and on the other hand, people who have an active and practical influence on Poland’s political, economic and cultural life.

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Putin’s Invisible Army

Putin’s Invisible Army

As far as the law is concerned, they are acting illegally, yet the state willingly utilizes them to implement an adventurist foreign policy. Russian mercenaries are “invisible,” and not only to the organs of justice.

Poland and the EU: Seeking a Two-way Street with China

Poland and the EU: Seeking a Two-way Street with China

The Yalta system, the “Iron Curtain” and membership in the Warsaw Pact, situated Poland as the borderland state at the crux of two hostile camps. Political changes in 1989 opened the possibility of establishing normal relations with Western European countries, and the breakthrough was June 1, 2004, when Poland joined the European Union.

Heritage Strengthens Our Identity

Heritage Strengthens Our Identity

In modern times, protecting cultural heritage has been a central component of almost any government’s policy. Heritage, which comprises the material evidence of a common past and shared experience, supports the building of a sense of community as well as self-confidence within society which is directly linked with strong social capital.

Poland, First to Fight

Poland, First to Fight

Poland was the first country to firmly resist the brutal expansion of the totalitarian powers that were utterly indifferent to the rights of weaker countries. Poland’s armed resistance to German aggression on September 1, 1939, was a turning point in world politics towards the Third Reich.

Estonian Spy Hunters

Estonian Spy Hunters

Western intelligence services have been paying special attention to increasing Russian espionage activity in recent years, which has reached Cold War levels. NATO’s eastern flank is particularly vulnerable to Moscow’s efforts.

Kazakhstan: An “Inhuman Land” Increasingly Human

Kazakhstan: An “Inhuman Land” Increasingly Human

When in 1936, Poles from Soviet Ukraine, and later from the areas of eastern Poland seized by the USSR during World War II, were deported to Kazakhstan; they called this country the “inhuman land.” Today, while repatriations back to Poland are being organized on the basis of a new law, Kazakhstan is changing for the better and living there is increasingly easy.

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