The Warsaw Institute Review

The Warsaw Institute Review is a free Polish magazine of the Warsaw Institute Foundation. We would like to present a broad spectrum of topics concerning Poland, a leader among East-Central European countries, in the form of analytical articles on political, legal, economic, social, historical and institutional issues. The authors of the articles in The Warsaw Institute Review are, on the one hand, analysts and experts, and on the other hand, people who have an active and practical influence on Poland’s political, economic and cultural life.

RELATED ARTICLES
The Polish Banking Sector in an Innovation Race

The Polish Banking Sector in an Innovation Race

Changes in the financial markets caused by the spread of digital technology pose a challenge for banking institutions in many countries; however, the starting position of the Polish banking sector in this innovative race is a good one.

Changes in the Design of the EU Budget after Brexit

Changes in the Design of the EU Budget after Brexit

In 2020, decisions will be made by the relevant bodies of the European Union, which will sanction its financial outlook for the years 2021-2027. The organization’s annual budgets will be constructed over the next seven years based on this framework.

Foreign Media Reports: Poland’s Image in the Western Press

Foreign Media Reports: Poland’s Image in the Western Press

What does the average German, Briton, Parisian or Brussels resident know about Poland? What comes to mind when they think of Poland? They probably know that Pope John Paul II was Polish and that the social movement Solidarity was born in Poland.

Wartime Losses of Private Art Collections of Warsaw Residents

Wartime Losses of Private Art Collections of Warsaw Residents

In addition to the physical destruction of the inhabitants of Warsaw and the city itself, pre-war private art collections of the city’s residents were almost entirely lost. While some museums and libraries managed to recover after the war, largely uncatalogued private collections were gone.